Monthly Archives: August 2018

Ant-Man and the Wasp, American movie (2018)

Marvel’s latest release, Ant-man and the Wasp, came shortly on the heels of Avengers:Infinity Wars, which was much darker and over-the-top depressing, leaving fans clamoring for a do-over in the fourth planned installment to the series. Raistlin0903 shared his review on his website of the “comic relief” addition to the Marvel Universe.

Raistlin0903

One of my favorite parts of going to a movie theatre, besides eating snacks, is the previews. It’s always exciting to see new and interesting trailers for movies that will be coming out later in the year. However these days, trailers have changed a lot from what they were years ago. While the main purpose of one is of course getting you excited for an upcoming film, nowadays I think that trailers quite often just give away too much. Sometimes whole plotpoints are revealed, and at times this certainly make me regret looking at one in the first place. Now I know what you are going to say: Why watch them then? I think that is a very good question. A good trailer for me, is one that shows you scenes to give you enough of a tease to look forward to a film, while at the same time holding…

View original post 1,061 more words

Advertisements

Easing Growing Pangs-Dealing with Empty Nest Syndrome

One of the hardest parts about being a parent is when their children move out and begin a life of their own.  Whether their kids are going away to college, beginning a career in another city or state, or simply settling into a new home with a significant other all parents face a sense of loss.  They can sometimes feel like they are no longer needed or as important in their children’s lives.

It’s okay to be sad when the kids leave the nest, but life doesn’t actually stop for mom or dad just they suddenly have a different role in the lives of their offspring.  There are ways to cope with the change in your relationship, and many things to look forward to ahead.

DSCF8941
Life changes, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad thing.  Photo by Chilanga Cement on Trend Hype / CC BY

Take care of yourself first.  If you feel depressed or overwhelmed by becoming an empty nester, talk to someone.  Whether you have a significant other to turn to, or you confide in a friend, or even seek professional help, it really does make a difference to know you’re not alone in this.  Your kids are starting a new chapter in their lives, and so should you.  The feelings of loss should ease as you settle into your new norm and your new relationship with your children.

Your relationship is changing, but your kids will always be yours.  The worry and the concern will remain, even when they’re out of the house and if you don’t see them as often.  They will always be a part of your lives and in your hearts and minds.  Keep in touch however you can-whether you call, text, skype, or email.  You can always visit, or have them visit you.  If you live close enough schedule regular family dinners, either at home or a restaurant.  Let them know that it’s still okay to turn to you when they need a sounding board, or advice.  You can offer to help them with big “adult” things, like shopping for a car and decorating a new home.

Your future is in your hands.  Just because your children don’t live at home anymore doesn’t mean your life is over.  Take advantage of your situation to try new things.  Make plans to travel somewhere you’ve always wanted to go, but couldn’t manage before because of schedules or budget.  Find a new hobby you can share with your spouse, or take a course at a local college.  Join a book club.  Volunteer.  Spend time planning how you will spoil any future grandkids.

Having your children grow up can be harder on the parents than it is for the kids.  Remember how big a wreck you were on their first day of school.  Hey, you survived that, right?  You’ll get through this too.  Just hang in there.

Amy

Amy Caudill’s Reviews : Into the Drowning Deep

Into the Drowning Deep by Mira Grant
Into the Drowning Deep (Rolling in the Deep, #1) 
by

50275498

Amy Caudill‘s review

Imagine if a multi-media corporation launched an expedition to uncover the truth of the existence of a legendary sea monster, the mermaid.  Imagine a ship sailed into the Marianna Trench, to search for evidence that the myth was actually based on fact, and crewed by scientists and cameramen.  Imagine they actually found what they were looking for, and were not at all prepared for it.

The Imagine Corporation has one failed expedition under its belt already; the crew of the Atargatis was a total loss, leaving behind grieving family, and impending litigation.  Seven years after the initial tragedy, a new expedition is organized, with twin goals of proving the existence of mermaids and restoring the image of the company.  The Melusine sets out with a new crew, many of whom have studied the footage recovered from the doomed Atargatis.  They know that the “mermaids” are out there and hopefully, they will survive long enough to get some answers this time.

I don’t often read horror stories, but Into the Drowning Deep was a recent choice of my local book club and I was intrigued enough to stay up late at night reading it through.  The preface contained flashbacks and reports drawn from camera footage of the doomed Atargatis, done in a manner that reminded me eerily of The Blair Witch.  As the story continued, I realized the monsters themselves and the action present would make a far better horror movie than many I’ve seen.

The author uses multiple points of view, as several of the narrators fall prey to the invaders, with a lot of thrills and action in the plot.  Grant also finds moments in the story to comment on the purpose of the expedition and of life itself with gorgeous prose, such as this quote from Chapter 18, where Luis Martines is musing on the job they have set out to do:

“Let deforestation do away with Bigfoot, let sonar destroy Nessie, but the sea would always be deep, always be dark, always be filled with wonders.”

The author clearly demonstrates that the ocean is stronger and more mysterious than man is capable of understanding or conquering.

In fact, the misnamed “mermaids” are truly more than the crew of the Melusine can handle-they are smart, fast, and strong, they can breathe air, and their secretions are toxic to humans.  Can the crew, led by a sirenologist and an Imagine executive survive long enough to raise the broken shields on the ship and trap the mermaids inside, or will they all be devoured by something even more deadly from the deep?

This book is truly an exciting read, which I give five stars, and recommend to anyone interested in horror, paranormal stories of creatures, or thriller stories.