Category Archives: Reposts

Blade Runner, American movie (1982)

Han Solo became a true movie star when I was a little girl. From Han Solo to Indiana Jones there seemed to be no heroic deed he couldn’t perform. Now, in following the current trend of revisiting past successes, a sequel to the science fiction classic Blade Runner is coming out this fall, where Harrison Ford will once again grace the screen. For those who have never seen the original, Raistlin0903 gives a very comprehensive summary.

Raistlin0903

Harrison Ford almost seems to be on a farewell tour, in which he reprises all of his most famous roles one more time. Two years ago he played Han Solo in the seventh installment of the famous Star Wars franchise, and three years from now he will be playing the role of Indiana Jones one final time. But all eyes are on him this year, as he will be making an appearance in the sequel to the classic science fiction movie Blade Runner. One has to wonder if making a sequel to what was obviously a landmark in science fiction history really is the best idea. Still having seen the first few trailers of the new movie, and the director of the film being Denis Villeneuve, I am cautiously optimistic for it. It is ofcourse a good thing that Harrison himself is also featured in this new one. We will…

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You’re here for the science, I’m here for the fiction

A fellow blogger shares his thoughts on critics who try to impose too much “scientific accuracy” on popular movies.

Pop Cultural Studies

Whatever happened to suspension of disbelief? Every time I load YouTube, I see that there’s a new video from the Nerdist explaining the science behind science fiction and fantasy films and TV shows. CinemaSins, best known for their “Everything Wrong With” series, does comedic criticism of movies which focuses on the quality of movies while also touching on stuff like continuity, but frequently gets overly fixated on various minutia that really don’t seem to matter. If an action hero jumps out of a window and lands unscathed in such a way that might break a bone for a normal person, CinemaSins sees this as a “sin.”

Science Fiction 1

Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate scientifically accurate films. I think it’s great when people can get involved in movies like Interstellar because of their scientific accuracy. And if films, like Interstellar, want to do their scientific research to create a fictional world grounded…

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Kacinema Thoughts #1: The 13th Doctor Reveal

For the first time ever a female timelord will be in control of the Tardis. Jodie Whittaker’s (from BBC’s Broadchurch) appointment as the thirteenth incarnation of Dr. Who this week has already sparked controversy among fans of the series. Here’s some first looks at the next season of the iconic series.

Movie Reviews & More!

So before I get into my actual thoughts on this, I feel I should explain why I felt the need to talk about it. Firstly, let me give some context to what’s going on for those who don’t know so much about Doctor Who. The series premiered on November 23, 1963 and starred William Hartnell as the titular Doctor. The Doctor is a Timelord from a distant planet called Gallifrey and goes on many crazy and wondrous adventures through time and space along with a companion or companions to take on them in his spaceship shaped like an old police phone box. But after 4 years of doing the show, Hartnell wished to leave the show. So it was written into the story that Timelords, when fatally injured, can regenerate.

And thus, from that point on, every few years, the Doctor would regenerate and take on a new face, sometimes…

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Writing Magic: Politicizing Fan Culture

“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, the most inexhaustible form of magic we have, capable both of inflicting injury and remedying it.” ~ Albus Dumbledore Fans are no doubt aware that online fanfics and the communities in which they circulate house rich critiques about gender, sexuality, race and identity. In fact, many fan writers deliberately insert […]

via Writing Magic: Politicizing Fan Culture — FAN/FIC Magazine

Here’s How Much Some Iconic Movie Houses Are Worth

Have you ever watched Home Alone and wondered what in the world Kevin’s dad must do for a living to be able to afford that gorgeous home and a Christmas vacation to Paris for the entire family? It’s the type of thought which likely only occurs to you as you get older and face the […]

via Infographic: Here’s How Much Some Iconic Movie Houses Are Worth — We Minored in Film

Repost:Ten really bad sci-fi/fantasy finales for Game of Thrones to avoid imitating

Game of Thrones will be entering its latest season with fans holding their breath about the fate of Jon Snow and others, and rumors has already begun to swirl about if next season will be the one in which HBO and George R.R. Martin finally decide to put a wrap on the conflicts within Westeros. While […]

via Ten really bad sci-fi/fantasy finales for Game of Thrones to avoid imitating — John’s Head

What’s IT All About?: How We Forgot the Murderous Clown

Adrian Daub’s fascinating essay in the LA Review of Books on the Stephen King classic IT — now 30 years old — reveals that the real horror of IT wasn’t Pennywise the supernatural clown, but our own, entirely human ability to forget the horrors of the past.

via But What’s IT All About?: How We Forgot the Murderous Clown — Longreads

Okay, I admit it, I never actually read the book myself.  I did however, watch the miniseries made about it, and had nightmares for months after.  Who would imagine that a clown, the very image of childhood innocence and fun, could be so terrifying?   Perhaps that was Stephen King’s intent.  Who would expect the icon of circuses and birthday parties could embody evil?

What monsters of books or screen terrify you the most?  I’d love to hear from you.

Amy