Tag Archives: Theodora Goss

Amy Caudill’s Reviews: Snow White Learns Witchcraft: Stories and Poems

Snow White Learns Witchcraft by Theodora Goss

Snow White Learns Witchcraft: Stories and Poems
by Theodora Goss (Goodreads Author), Jane Yolen (Goodreads Author) (Introduction)
Amy Caudill‘s review

I’m a big fan of the concept of rehashing fairy tales.  Heaven knows it’s not a new idea- it’s been done multiple times: by Disney; by modern authors; by producers of such mini-series as The 10th Kingdom and television shows such as Once Upon a Time; and these are frequently well-received.  So, when I find that Theodora Goss, an author I’ve read before, wrote an anthology in this genre, I had to check it out.

What I found was a collection of short stories and poems, some new version of famous fairy tales and others I was less familiar with, but ultimately an interesting compilation of shorts perfect for reading in the break room or when you have a just a few minutes to yourself.

Some of the stories were funny and poignant at the same time.  One of my favorites was the version of the little mermaid (not Ariel) and the Sea Witch, who have grown to be lonely old women who only have each other for company.  I also enjoyed the Cinderella story, as told through the voice of one of the stepsisters, who became a podiatrist after cutting off part of her foot in an attempt to fit into the crystal shoe.

Some of the stories were morbid; some were optimistic; as the damsels in distress took responsibility for their own destinies and realized they had modern ideals and independence, even if the world they lived in didn’t agree.  Some were a little depressing, such as the Red Riding Hood story which depicted the Huntsman as also being a werewolf. 

The writing was exceptional, though I wish the author spent more time (and words) on the story from which the collection takes its title.  Snow White has always been one of my personal favorite fairy tales, but this version is so short that perhaps only its theme is worth mentioning-the character wants to write her own ending to the story.

Still, it is a brilliant collection, and a quick read; a rather refreshing change from the 400-600 page tomes that normally attract me.  I easily give it 4.5 stars and recommend it to fans of both revamped fairy tales and strong female characters.

Amy Caudill’s Reviews : The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter

The Strange Case of the Alchemist's Daughter by Theodora Goss
The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter (The Extraordinary Adventures of the Athena Club, #1) by

Theodora Goss (Goodreads Author)
50275498

Amy Caudill‘s review :

Mary Jekyll, soon after the death of her mother, receives from the latter’s lawyer a number of papers belonging to her father, who died under mysterious circumstances when she was a child, as well as details of a bank account making payments on behalf of someone named Hyde.  Mary recognizes the name as one of her father’s former employees, who was accused of murder and disappeared around the time of her father’s death.

Suddenly left destitute, she takes the information to Sherlock Holmes hoping to claim a reward for the capture of the elusive Hyde. What she finds instead is a previously unknown half-sister, along with more questions about her late father’s involvement with a group called the Société des Alchimistes, or the Alchemist’s Society, that conducted sinister experiments in the name of science.

As she investigates, both on her own and with Holmes, she begins to gather a most unlikely group of acquaintances; young women who, like herself, are the daughters, and sometimes test subjects, of this group of mad scientists.  In addition to Diana Hyde, the fourteen year old wild child; there is Beatrice Rappaccinni, whose breath is literally poisonous; Catherine Moreau, a young woman who began life as a puma; and Justine Frankenstein, the incredibly strong but gentle giant of a woman.   Together these young women will face dangers that would have most men quaking in fear, and ultimately form an alliance of their own, The Athena Club.

The author of this book used a most interesting device, of having the “characters” chime in from time to time, helping with the narration and arguing how best to tell the story.  I found it rather humorous, having various characters argue with Catherine, the supposed writer, but these interruptions assisted in further developing the relationships between the various cast, and bringing to light the story that was being told as if it happened in their not-too-distant past.

This book did contain quite a bit of world-building, as this is the first book in a series, but what a world!  Each character, a “self-proclaimed” monster, tells her own story of her father’s experiments which led to her own creation.  The setup of all these backstories, however, prove to be integral to the plot of both the book and the series, as much information is uncovered that leads to the circumstances of the “current” murders, taking place in White Chapel, a.k.a. Jack the Ripper.  The resolution of the Ripper cases are somewhat secondary to the plot, though, as the ladies and Sherlock agree, the “stranger than fiction” crimes cannot be shared with the public, for the danger it would present to the group.

Though there are elements of the paranormal in this novel, and despite the players, this is not a horror story, but rather chronicles the beginning of a most unusual “club,” the victims and survivors, even if they themselves and others might call them monsters.  I award this book four stars, and would recommend it to any readers who love strong female characters, especially those from the Victorian era, as well as fans of Sherlock Holmes-style mysteries, paranormal stories, and urban fantasy.